Latest News

By Dr Jennifer Sisson*

A sign at Bali’s Monkey Forest in Ubud warns tourists “Don't stare at or tease the monkeys!”
It’s very good advice. It would be even better if it told them “Don’t feed the monkeys! Don’t pat them! Stay well clear!”
But, then the woman who sits nearby selling bananas to tourists to feed the ever-hungry macaques would probably be out of business.
As it turns out she does a brisk trade. So do local doctors.
By now, you’ve probably guessed how this story goes: Aussie traveller buys bananas. Monkey jumps onto man’s shoulder to eat banana. Monkey suddenly ‘freaks out’ and bites man on head. Hard. Twice.
Anthony Wallace recently brought home his monkey memento – nasty scalp wounds. After getting basic first-aid in Bali, Mr Wallace returned to East Gosford in New South Wales to have rabies immunoglobulin injected around the wound and to begin a post-exposure course of four rabies vaccine injections to prevent infection.

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By Dr Jennifer Sisson*

Are you pregnant or do you and your partner plan to start a family soon?
If so, do you intend to travel overseas this year?
If you answered ‘yes’ to both of those questions the list of places considered safe for you to visit is shrinking rapidly due to the Zika virus.
Worrying developments continue to keep the mosquito-borne virus firmly in the headlines.
Evidence is becoming stronger that the virus is linked to a sharp increase in cases of microcephaly among infants born to Zika-infected mothers in tropical Latin America and the Pacific islands, along with other neurological conditions.
Microcephaly causes babies to be born with a smaller-than-normal head and is likely to result in lifelong brain damage.

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By Dr Eddy Bajrovic*

The world has learned something new – and worrying – about dengue fever.
An estimated 390 million people are infected with dengue fever annually and 50% of the world’s population is at risk of infection, according to the WHO.
Almost all of the 1638 Aussies who had their diagnosis of dengue confirmed through a blood test last year were infected while travelling overseas – mainly in Asia. (A small percentage was infected in North Queensland, where imported cases spark localised outbreaks each summer.)
But, only about 25% of people infected with dengue actually get its symptoms – a high temperature, headache, pain behind the eyes, rash, and severe aching of muscles, joints, and bones (the reason dengue is also called ‘breakbone fever’).
It was previously thought that it was only these ‘symptomatic’ people who were able to pass on the virus to someone else through a mozzie bite. The reasoning was that only those who were sick would have enough of the virus in their blood stream to actually infect a mosquito that bites them, before passing on the illness by biting another person who entered their territory.

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By Dr Eddy Bajrovic*

You don’t need to go overseas to experience ‘traveller’s diarrhoea’. You can get TD by swimming in your council or backyard pool – even if it’s properly chlorinated.
Australia is currently experiencing one of its worst years in more than a decade for the parasitic disease Cryptosporidium, which is a leading cause of TD in developing and developed countries.
‘Crypto’ is a notifiable disease in Australia and there have been 3568 confirmed cases nationwide in 2015, with Queensland (1237 cases) and NSW (898) already registering more than double last year’s total. Because the disease is not severe in most healthy people, many more cases have gone undiagnosed.
Notifications of cryptosporidiosis, the disease caused by swallowing the parasites, increased by more than three times the usual average in NSW during October and November, NSW Health Director of Health Protection, Dr Jeremy McAnulty said in a statement last week.
He urged people who have, or recently had, diarrhoea to stay out of public swimming pools for two weeks in an effort to prevent widespread outbreaks this summer.

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Adventurous Australians are continuing to put themselves at risk of falling ill during or after overseas travel, with new figures showing less than half (46%) of those visiting at-risk destinations sought health advice before their trip.

Research involving more than 1000 outbound travellers has revealed that many aren’t aware of potential health risks abroad, and carefree attitudes are exposing them to potentially severe diseases.
In fact, at-risk destinations comprise over half of all resident departures from Australia (52%). At-risk destinations are those with a known risk to travellers of contracting infectious diseases that are preventable through vaccinations and other precautions.
Destinations such as South-East Asia and South America are travel hot-spots for Aussies where – for leisure and business travellers alike – there’s a potentially greater risk of illness from food and water-borne diseases, such as typhoid and hepatitis A.
“Australians are known for their love of travel and want to experience the culture and cuisine that these countries have to offer,” said Dr Eddy Bajrovic, the Medical Director of Travelvax Australia.
“But, it can expose them to many potential health risks.
“These can be avoided or prevented with the right knowledge and behaviour, which is why a visit to a travel doctor or GP should be an essential part of planning an overseas holiday.”

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By Dr Eddy Bajrovic*

Hear the words ‘hepatitis’ and ‘international travel’ together and it’s likely Hepatitis A is being discussed.
Hep A is not only spread directly from person to person, but also through food, beverages and everyday items that have been contaminated with the virus, making it one of the most persistent risks for travellers visiting any developing countries – even those staying for just a couple of weeks in better quality accommodation.
In Australia, almost all cases of Hep A are among returned travellers or from outbreaks linked to imported foods, such as frozen berries.
On the other hand, the B and C strains of hepatitis, which are transmitted in infected blood and body fluids, are common here. For Aussie travellers, infection from hepatitis B, C or the rarer fourth ‘D’ strain are usually the result of unprotected sex with an infected person, needle sharing, or via contaminated equipment used during an emergency medical procedure, acupuncture, body piercing or tattooing.
But, travellers who visit Travelvax Australia’s clinics are often surprised to hear that there’s a fifth strain of the liver disease – hepatitis E.
Like hepatitis A, Hep E is also spread by the faecal-oral route, usually when sewage contaminates water or food, particularly raw shellfish. Large-scale epidemics periodically occur in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Central America, especially after floods and other natural disasters.

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